TikTok's 3-2-8 fitness method is a trainer-approved workout plan

If the 12-3-30 treadmill workout seems too intense and the lazy girl home walk workouts seem too easy, you may well land in the middle with TikTok’s 3-2-8 fitness trend – a routine Coach-approved that encourages you to do a variety of different exercises throughout the week.

Instead of sticking to one type of movement, the 3-2-8 method of fitness is all about working out in different ways. Created by TikTok user and Pilates specialist @natalieroseuk, the goal is to do three strength training workouts per week and two low impact workouts per week, while aiming for 8,000 steps per day. This notion is nothing new, but the way it’s packaged is so appealing – and it’s clearly attracting a following on TikTok, where it has over 270 million views and countless videos with people sharing stories of success. Apparently it’s THE way to plan a complete fitness routine for the whole body.

Personal Trainer and Certified Pilates Instructor Karina Blackwood loves that the 3-2-8 is so comprehensive. “It’s also a great option for those who get bored easily and like to move around, because the 3-2-8 involves different types of workouts,” she told Bustle. “You don’t have to limit yourself to yoga or weight training, but you can combine the two or do three different workouts per week. Plus, you’ll work on your strength, mobility, balance, and flexibility at the same time. Coming soon, learn all about the 3-2-8 training method.

The 3-2-8 fitness method

The 3-2-8 method consists of three strength workouts per week, two low-impact workouts per week, and 8,000 steps per day — and each component has unique, trainer-approved benefits.

Bodybuilding workouts x 3

Strength training includes any type of weightlifting or bodyweight-based movement, such as squats, push-ups or lunges, Blackwood says. While full-body compound exercises that hit multiple muscles are always a good bet – think deadlifts – you can split your strength training and do full body one day, upper body another, then lower. of the body after that, depending on your mood. The beauty is that it’s flexible, so you can make the structure work for you.

The 3-2-8 is aimed at progressive overload training, where you increase your rep count every four to six weeks – that way you always get better.

Low impact workouts x 2

On low-impact training days, opt for something like a Pilates, barre, or yoga class that lengthens and stretches your muscles. According to the 3-2-8 rules, these workouts are perfect for days when you’re feeling tired or when you’re on your period.

Blackwood says low-impact workouts are also great for your overall health and fitness. “Low-impact exercises tend to be gentle on your joints and reduce the risk of injury,” she says. They also improve your flexibility and range of motion. (See? Cover all those bases.)

Walk 8,000 steps a day

According to personal trainer Michael Hamlin, NSCA, CSCS, walking 8,000 steps per day is more achievable than the generally recommended 10,000 steps per day, while providing the same benefits. “It may be a more realistic target for those who have sedentary lifestyles or work long hours,” he told Bustle. While it’ll shave a few thousand off that daily goal of 10,000, taking 8,000 steps a day is still good for you — and it encourages you to get outside (although you could do walking exercises at home instead) .

The disadvantages of the 3-2-8 practice

A potential downside is that the 3-2-8 isn’t difficult enough, Hamlin says. If you have big fitness goals, you may need more than three days of strength training per week. The workout also doesn’t guarantee any movement that raises your heart rate, like cardio or HIIT, unless you deliberately choose a low-impact cardio workout like rowing or swimming. Because it’s so customizable, you need to make sure you choose a variety of activities.

The essential

The 3-2-8 is a great starting point for anyone looking for a fitness plan to follow, says Hamlin. “It combines both strength training and low-impact cardio, which can provide a complete workout,” he says. “The stepper part can reduce the risk of many different health conditions, which is great.”

Overall, Blackwood says she’s a huge fan. “As a Pilates instructor, I like to combine both strength training and low impact workouts into my weekly workout routine and this is what I recommend to my clients for a well balanced routine. and effective.”

Sources:

Karina Blackwood, Personal Trainer, Certified Pilates Instructor

Michael Hamlin, NSCA, CSCS, personal trainer

By admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *